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Artworld Salon » Blog Archive » Quest for art’s Idol-Talent-Factor-Runway
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Quest for art’s Idol-Talent-Factor-Runway

Monday November 23, 2009 | 17:21 by Ossian Ward | permalink

c1823697b82db33bb0dcc11edf3397e579847b3aA new four-part reality show, School of Saatchi, begins tonight on BBC television (and will be viewable online). Six artists from an open submission competition are selected, first by a panel of judges – artist Tracey Emin, critic Matthew Collings, collector Frank Cohen and Kate Bush, director of the Barbican Art Gallery – and then vetted by Charles Saatchi. The London-based collector does not himself appear on screen, despite – or perhaps because – he’s trailed as ‘one of the most influential and enigmatic figures in the art world’ (full disclosure: I was asked to appear in some guise in the programme, but declined). Anyway, the show’s tone is Identikit reality TV fare – a set of silly tasks and crashing verdicts that are peppered with a cheeky voiceover and incidental music.

In the same vein is the yet-to-be-aired ArtStar on US network Bravo, produced by that well-known art world luminary, Sarah Jessica Parker. The only other judge revealed so far is Simon de Pury, who’s no stranger to publicity, or indeed to the conflation of art with the world of pop music, seen here belittling his profession to a thumping Euro-house soundtrack and now fresh from his Saturday night auction/performance, in which he sold music-related art to the live accompaniment of techno DJ Matthew Herbert.

But back to the slow creep of art on reality TV, there’s obviously a place for the kind of populist programming that can cut through the crap that the general public usually associates with our intellectually elitist art form. However, there’s also an unhealthy tendency here that assumes you can uncover artistic talent like you can with a singer or rock star – by putting them in front of an audience or a panel of judges and expecting them to perform, explain and show off their work.

Apart from some cash, an exhibition, a studio space and some residual fame, will such talent spotting ever result in serious appreciation for any of the so-called Next Big Things plucked from obscurity? British artist Phil Collins has already explored the phenomenon of the negative impact such makeover/reality/talk shows can have on its participants in a piece for the Turner Prize in 2006 called Shady Lane. Maybe he’ll be counselling fellow artists from now on: Do you feel your life has been ruined by your appearance on television?

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One Response

  1. 1. Ian Charles Stewart Says:

    The fun thing with this series is probably going to be the comments and antics of the judges, more than the potential discovery of new Art Stars. Even with the biggest of these reality shows, viz Pop Idol / Americal Idol, the audience gets as much of a kick out of seeing how supposed “insiders” behave and critique, as actually seeing new artists perform (good or bad). The real stars of those shows are, after all, the judges.

    So whilst I agree with Ossian’s scepticism that this short series is ever likely to launch a new Damien (though as with the Idol series they might launch a brief shooting star) I think the show has some merit in exposing the (sometimes shallow) thought processes and language of contemporary Art world insiders today.

    For that reason alone, I would watch it.


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